The shocking video that lays bare dire state of NHS

Video that lays bare state of NHS: Irate nurse tells A&E patients they face 13-HOUR wait and may spend night in waiting room amid warnings millions are showing up at casualty departments because they can’t see a GP

Clip was filmed by patient at Princess Alexandra Hospital Trust in Harlow, Essex, on Monday afternoonNurses warned patients faced waits of up to 13 hours and that they could be spending night in waiting room Comes as A&Es reach breaking point across country with a record 24,000 waiting 12+ hours each month

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This is the moment patients in a crowded A&E were told they could be waiting 13 hours to be seen, in a video which epitomises the crisis within the NHS.

Patients’ rights groups said it was ‘completely unacceptable’ for patients to be waiting 13 hours in the 21st century, while Health Secretary Sajid Javid admitted the video was ‘not what anyone wants to see’.

The scenes at Princess Alexandra Hospital Trust in Harlow are thought to be the tip of the iceberg as emergency departments across the country approach breaking point.

Record numbers of patients are flooding back into the health service after years of delays caused by the Covid pandemic, which has seen A&E wait times reach record highs.

Senior medics have warned difficulties getting a GP appointment means desperate patients are being left with no choice but to show up at emergency or walk-in services instead.

One patient in her sixties from Oxfordshire told MailOnline that GP practices were using A&Es as a ‘triage service’, while campaign group Silver Voices said many patients ‘are only there because they can’t see a family doctor.’

In the latest clip, filmed on Monday at around 4pm, a female nurse tells patients they might have to spend the entire night in the waiting room because there are no free beds in the Essex hospital.

She can be heard saying: ‘We’ve got 170 patients in the department, there are 90 patients waiting to be seen at the moment. Our current wait time for a doctor is seven-and-a-half hours.

‘I estimate by the time I go home in the morning at 8 o’clock some of you will still be waiting because the waits will get up to 13 hours.

‘There are currently no beds in the trust, we’re trying to make space if we can but if people are admitted there’s a chance they’ll stay in A&E overnight.

‘We will do our best to make you comfortable but please don’t expect you will be going direct to a ward because that might not happen.’

A female NHS worker at the Princess Alexandra Hospital Trust in Harlow warns patients there are no free beds and they face spending the night in the waiting room

NHS data on A&E performance in April shows a record 24,138 people were forced to wait 12 hours or more to be treated, three times longer than the NHS target and the worst figure on record

Relatives of patients at the A&E at Princess Alexandra Hospital Trust were also asked to leave because the emergency department was so busy. 

The struggling hospital is now actively encouraging people to stay away unless they have a life-threatening medical emergency due to ‘extremely high demand’.

It comes as latest NHS figures show a record 24,000 people are waiting 12 or more hours in A&E every month before being seen — three times the NHS target.

Dennis Reed, director at Silver Voices, told MailOnline that 13-hour waits ‘was completely unacceptable in the 21st century’.

‘There is a lack of access to GPs, it’s very sporadic, so A&Es are taking people who really need a doctor but can’t get one, which is resulting in A&Es being completely overloaded.

‘People only go to A&E if there is something seriously wrong with them, everyone knows the waiting times in hospitals are hours long, nobody is going to go on A&E on a whim, they are going to A&E because that’s the only place they can finally get help for their condition.’

Mr Reed called on the Government to deliver on its promise to hire 6,000 more GPs, a key promise in the Conservative Party’s general election manifesto in 2019. 

The Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM) has previously warned difficulties in seeing a GP was leading to a crisis in emergency departments.

The mother-in-law of a car crash patient patient who was at Harlow A&E on Monday told MailOnline the NHS was ‘clearly on its knees’.

She said: ‘My son-in-law visited A&E on the evening of June 6 2022 at approximately 4pm after being involved in a RTA [road traffic accident]. 

Ambulance figures for April show waits for paramedics fell compared to March but were higher than nearly all other months since records began. Ambulances took an average of 51 minutes and 22 seconds to respond to category two calls, such as burns, epilepsy and strokes. This is nine minutes and 41 seconds quicker than one month earlier

The number of people waiting for routine hospital treatment in England has soared to another record of 6.36million. NHS data shows one in nine people were in the queue for elective operations such as hip and knee replacements and cataracts surgery by March — up from 6.18m in February 

NHS England aims to treat 85 per cent of cancer patients who receive an urgent referral from their GP within two months, but in November 2021, the latest available, only 67.5 per cent of patients received treatment in this time frame. While the problem predates the Covid pandemic, the disruption to services caused by the virus has exacerbated the problem

‘He left in pain after hearing the nurse’s announcement. Others verbally abused her. This is our NHS on its knees after 12 years of underfunding. ‘

She revealed her son-in-law was involved in a three-car crash and was suffering ‘a lot of pain’ in his back, neck and arm.

He decided to go home after hearing that he might have to wait 12 hours and has now been referred for an emergency X-ray. 

Stephanie Lawton, chief operating officer at The Princess Alexandra Hospital NHS Trust, said: ‘We are currently experiencing extremely high demand for our emergency care services and have seen a significant increase in attendances in our emergency department. 

GPs threaten to STRIKE over contract that will force practices to offer face-to-face appointments on Saturdays and evenings

GPs are threatening to strike over a new contract that would force them to offer appointments on weekday evenings and on Saturdays. 

Family doctors, who earn an average of £100,000 per year and generally work the equivalent of three days a week, will discuss the prospect of industrial action at the British Medical Association (BMA’s) annual meeting later this month.

It comes in response to a new NHS England order that says by October GP practices need to offer routine face-to-face appointments from 9am to 5pm on Saturdays, as well as 9am to 8pm on weekdays.

The union’s members already voted in favour of industrial action last November amid the row.

But they held off on striking because of a low turnout that saw just 35 per cent of GP practices vote. 

Newly elected union bosses have now called for a ‘fresh start’ and have tabled a new motion for the BMA’s three-day annual meeting on June 27.

The motion calls on the union to ‘act upon the GP ballot of 2021 and to organise opposition to the imposition of the new contract including industrial action if necessary’. 

GPs are threatening to strike over a new contract that would force them to offer appointments on weekday evenings and on Saturdays. 

Family doctors, who earn an average of £100,000 per year and generally work the equivalent of three days a week, will discuss the prospect of industrial action at the British Medical Association (BMA’s) annual meeting later this month.

It comes in response to a new NHS England order that says by October GP practices need to offer routine face-to-face appointments from 9am to 5pm on Saturdays, as well as 9am to 8pm on weekdays.

The union’s members already voted in favour of industrial action last November amid the row.

But they held off on striking because of a low turnout that saw just 35 per cent of GP practices vote. 

Newly elected union bosses have now called for a ‘fresh start’ and have tabled a new motion for the BMA’s three-day annual meeting on June 27.

The motion calls on the union to ‘act upon the GP ballot of 2021 and to organise opposition to the imposition of the new contract including industrial action if necessary’. 

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‘Our teams are working hard to assess and treat patients as quickly and effectively as possible to reduce delays, prioritising those in most clinical need. 

‘The public can help us to ease pressures by using the NHS 111 service for healthcare advice in non-urgent cases. As ever, please continue to call 999 or attend the emergency department for urgent and life-threatening emergencies.’ 

Latest NHS England data shows 2million people in England were treated in A&E  departments in April – on par with the highest number ever.

Just 70 per cent of people were seen within the health service’s own four-hour target — the second-lowest rate since records began in 2010.

A total of 131,905 people waited at least four hours from the decision to admit to admission in March.

And 24,138 were forced to wait more than 12 hours – the highest number ever. At the same time a wider crisis is brewing within the health service. 

A record one in nine people (6.4million) were waiting for elective operations such as hip and knee replacements and cataracts surgery by March.

There are now 306,000 who have been waiting for more than a year for their operation and 16,796 have been seeking treatment for more than two years.

Ambulance waiting times are also at record low levels, with heart attack patients now waiting more than an hour on average for 999 callouts.

Staffing crises and people delaying coming forward during the pandemic are thought to be the main causes of the unprecedented situation.

But analysis published last month found that millions of visits to hospital accident and emergency units in the past year may have been due to people being unable to see their GP.

A patient in her 60s from Oxfordshire, who wished to remain anonymous, told MailOnline: ‘The GP surgeries are using A&E as a triage service. You cannot physically see a GP anymore. 

‘If you phone the surgery you are put on hold and played a relentless pre-recorded message telling you ‘due to the ongoing pandemic’ appointments are scaled back and telling you to hang up and fill out an eConsult form instead. 

‘Then, these tickbox online forms end up redirecting you to seek ‘urgent medical attention’ in most cases anyway. So, what choice do people have when they are in genuine need?

‘If by some miracle you do finally get through on the phone, and all of the ‘appointments’ haven’t gone, they inform you that the doctor won’t see you face-to-face anyway and will call you back instead – and if you need to see someone urgently to go to A&E. It is an endless cycle.

‘I don’t call a doctor unless I need to. No-one in their right mind wants to sit in A&E for 13 hours just to see a doctor, but they are being left with very little choice. 

‘No doubt there are many people in A&E who don’t need to be there, but I am fed up with all patients being painted as timewasters.’ 

Research by health watchdog the Care Quality Commission (CQC) found almost one in five A&E patients surveyed had resorted to emergency departments because they couldn’t get advice or treatment elsewhere.

Of those, the research found, around one third (35 per cent) said there were no appointments available and 30 per cent said they were not able to get through to or access the service.

In total, 4.7million visits to hospital accident and emergency units were attributed to a lack of access to GPs.

The Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM) said late last year this was causing ‘dangerous crowding’ in A&Es which is ‘unsafe and unconscionable and threatens patient safety’.

Tens of millions of GP appointments were cancelled or done remotely during Covid so doctors could focus on the virus, leading to a post-pandemic boom in demand.

But many patients are still struggling to see a GP as services fail to bounce back, with less than half of appointments being conducted face-to-face.

At the same time there are 1,500 fewer fully qualified family doctors working in England compared to five years ago.

Separate figures show that some areas of the country have just one GP for every 2,500 patients.

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